Coast Salish Tribes Oppose Transmountain Pipeline

Coast Salish Tribes Oppose Transmountain Pipeline

  prosperitysaskatchewan.ca

prosperitysaskatchewan.ca

Coast Salish Tribes oppose Kinder Morgan’s proposed Transmountain tar sands pipeline, which would triple the amount of oil shipped from tar sands fields in Alberta to the British Columbia coast.  An oil spill from the project would cause substantial devastation to the cultures and livelihoods of Coast Salish Nations. In addition, the project would dramatically increase the passage of tankers and bulk carriers through the Salish Sea on both sides of the U.S. - Canada border.

On November 28, 2016, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced approval of the Kinder Morgan project, despite continued opposition from First Nations that the pipeline would impact.

“I stand tall and firmly say that this pipeline is not going to be built, whatever it takes,” said Charlene Aleck, an elected councilor of the Tsleil-Waututh Nation. “You don’t just need First Nations’ consultation, you need their consent. They have never had a meaningful consultation, let alone gotten to consent,” she said of Kinder Morgan.

“The Tulalip Tribes are extremely disappointed with Prime Minister Trudeau’s approval of the TransMountain Pipeline, and we face the very real threat of an oil spill that puts the Salish Sea at risk,” said Mel Sheldon, Tulalip Tribes Chairman. “Prime Minister Trudeau has made a decision that carries with it potentially catastrophic consequences for our Treaty-reserved rights to fish and harvest in our usual and accustomed territories, one that directly affects United States waters, and threatens the environment on which our treaty rights depend.”

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